Selecting

With many different varieties of apples grown around the world, Washington State grows the majority of apples consumed by Americans. Whatever the color or variety you choose, look for bruise-free fruit with firm, shiny skin. Since apples are a hardy fruit they are available year-around, new crop apples are available from summer's end through late fall.


Variety

Characteristics

Snacking

Pie

Baked

Sauce

Freezing

Braeburn

Crisp, firm, sweet, tart and spicy, long-lasting

Excellent

Good

Fair

Good

Good

Cameo

Sweet-tart, firm

Excellent

Excellent

Fair

Excellent

Good

Fuji

Extra crisp, sweet-tart

Excellent

Fair

Fair

Fair

Poor

Gala

Mildly sweet, fruity, fragrant, thin skinned

Excellent

Good

Poor

Good

Poor

Gingergold

Mildly sweet, similar to Golden Delicious

Excellent

Excellent

Fair

Excellent

Poor

Golden Delicious

 Soft, very sweet, juicy

Very Good

Excellent

Fair

Excellent

Excellent

Granny Smith

Crunchy, tart, juicy

Very Good

Excellent

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Honeycrisp

Crisp, extra sweet

Excellent

Poor

Good

Excellent

Excellent

Jonagold

 Tart, crisp, juicy

Excellent

Very Good

Very Good

Fair

Good

Macintosh

Tender, sweet

Excellent

Good

Poor

Very Good

Poor

Pink Lady

Firm, crisp, sweet-tart

Excellent

Good

Good

Fair

Good

Red Delicious

 Juicy, very sweet

Very good

Poor

Poor

Fair

Excellent

Rome

 Soft, juicy, sweet

Fair

Very Good

Excellent

Good

Good

 

Storing

Ideal storage for apples, are under refrigeration between 34-38 F, where they can last up to 90 days. At room temperature apples ripen within a day or two, so if  you consume them in a few days they are fine on the counter. Apples will absorb odors produced by potatoes, bulb onions, or any strong flavored item. When apples ripen, they emit a lot of ethylene gas, which causes other fruit and vegetables to ripen faster so it is recommended to keep them in their own crisper.

 

Preparation

Most apples are consumed fresh, but some are canned or used for juice. Another popular use of apples is in baking because they blend so well with a variety of spices and flavors.  Apples complement pork, squash, and a range of cheeses.


Nutrition Information

Apples, with skin (edible parts)
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy 50 kcal   220 kJ

Carbohydrates    

13.81 g

- Sugars  10.39 g

- Dietary fiber  2.4 g  

Fat

0.17 g

Protein

0.26 g

Vitamin A equiv.  3 μg 

0%

Thiamin (Vit. B1)  0.017 mg  

1%

Riboflavin (Vit. B2)  0.026 mg  

2%

Niacin (Vit. B3)  0.091 mg  

1%

Pantothenic acid (B5)  0.061 mg 

1%

Vitamin B6  0.041 mg

3%

Folate (Vit. B9)  3 μg 

1%

Vitamin C  4.6 mg

8%

Calcium  6 mg

1%

Iron  0.12 mg

1%

Magnesium  5 mg

1% 

Phosphorus  11 mg

2%

Potassium  107 mg  

2%

Zinc  0.04 mg

0%

Percentages are relative to US
recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database