Selectingbroccoli

Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family and a first cousin of the cauliflower in which they are both served practically the same way. When selecting broccoli look for plenty of green coloring of the heads as well as the leaves and stems. Size of heads may vary but this bears no relation to the eating quality. Broccoli floret buds should be dark green or purplish-green with tight and compact buds. The more yellow the floret the less desirable and fresh the broccoli is.

Storing

Refrigerate broccoli in an open plastic bag unwashed to maintain freshness. Broccoli will last up to four days refrigerated and unwashed, wash broccoli only when ready to be prepared

Preparation

To prepare broccoli for cooking, wash and trim the main stem. Do not remove the whole stem because the stalk is edible.  Cooking broccoli can be done in a variety of ways including boiling, steaming, microwave, and stir-fry. Broccoli can be used in a number of dishes including soups, salads, pasta, stir-fries, and as a side dish just by itself. Broccoli can be eaten raw and is a good way to consume since there is no loss of nutrients do to cooking.


Nutrition Information

Bell peppers are low in calories and very high in vitamins C, A and K, a good source of vitamin B6.


Broccoli, raw (edible parts), 100g
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy 30 kcal   140 kJ

Carbohydrates    

6.64 g

- Sugars 1.7 g

- Dietary fiber 2.6 g

Fat

0.37 g

Protein

2.82 g

Water

89.30g

Vitamin A equiv.  31 μg 

3%

- β-carotene 361 μg 

3%

Thiamin (Vit. B1) 0.071 mg

5%

Riboflavin (Vit. B2) 0.117 mg

8%

Niacin (Vit. B3) 0.639 mg

4%

Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.573 mg 

11%

Vitamin B6  0.175 mg

13%

Folate (Vit. B9) 63 μg 

16%

Vitamin C 8.92 mg

15%

Calcium 47 mg

5%

Iron 0.73 mg

6%

Magnesium 21 mg

6% 

Phosphorus 66 mg

9%

Potassium 316 mg

7%

Zinc 0.41 mg

4%

Percentages are relative to US
recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database