Selectingcauliflower

Cauliflower is a member of the cabbage family and a first cousin of the broccoli in which they are both served practically the same way. When selecting cauliflower look for ivory white heads and avoid spotted, speckled or bruised heads. Size of heads may vary but this bears no relation to the eating quality.

Storing


Refrigerate cauliflower in an open plastic bag unwashed to maintain freshness. Cauliflower will last up to four days refrigerated and unwashed, wash cauliflower only when ready to be prepared

Preparation

To prepare cauliflower for cooking, the outer leaves and thick stalks are removed, leaving only the florets. The leaves are also edible, but are most often discarded. The florets should be broken into similar-sized pieces so they are cooked evenly. After eight minutes of steaming, or five minutes of boiling, the florets should be soft, but not mushy (depending on size). Cooking broccoli can be done in a variety of ways steaming, microwave, and stir-fry are usually the most popular. Unlike broccoli  boiling cauliflower may cause the cauliflower to emit asulfurous smell. Cauliflower can be used in a number of dishes including soups, salads, pasta, stir-fries, and as a side dish just by itself. Cauliflower can be eaten raw and is a good way to consume since there is no loss of nutrients to do cooking.


Nutrition Information


Cauliflower, raw (edible parts)
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy 20 kcal   100 kJ

Carbohydrates 

5 g

- Sugars 2.4 g

- Dietary fiber 2.5 g

Fat

0 g

Protein

2 g

Thiamin (Vit. B1) 0.057 mg

4%

Riboflavin (Vit. B2) 0.063 mg

4%

Niacin (Vit. B3) 0.53 mg

4%

Pantothenic acid (B5)  0.65 mg 

13%

Vitamin B6  0.22 mg

17%

Folate (Vit. B9) 57 μg 

14%

Vitamin C 46 mg

77%

Calcium 22 mg

2%

Iron 0.44 mg

4%

Magnesium  15 mg

4% 

Phosphorus 44 mg

6%

Potassium  300 mg  

6%

Zinc  0.28 mg

3%

Percentages are relative to US
recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database