Selectinggrapefruit

When selecting grapefruit like any other citrus fruit look for heavy, firm and smooth texture, with a well rounded or flattened shape will indicate a juicy grapefruit. Avoid grapefruit that is coarse, puffy and rough. Since grapefruit is three quarters liquid heaviness is a good indication of juice content. Do not worry about color when selecting grapefruit; color can range from pale yellow to russet or bronze. Brightly colored fruit is naturally more appealing but it does not mean it is going to be juicier or taste better. Minor surface blemishes do not affect the eating quality, although the presence of a bad bruise may indicate some internal breakdown.

Storing

Store grapefruit at room temperature up to a week and four weeks in the refrigerator.

Preparation

Grapefruits like oranges can be juiced or added to drinks, fruit salads and salad dressings for a refreshing treat. It also can be sautéed, made into jellies, marmalades or added to chutney. For breakfast cut in half and scoop out the flesh with a spoon and enjoy a nutritious meal. Add shredded grapefruit peel to sauces and salad dressings. Before eating always rinse grapefruit under cool water.


Nutrition Information


Grapefruit, raw, white, all areas
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy 30 kcal   140 kJ

Carbohydrates    

8.41 g

- Sugars  7.31 g

- Dietary fiber  1.1 g  

Fat

0.10 g

Protein

0.69 g

Water

90.48 g

Thiamin (Vit. B1)  0.037 mg  

3%

Riboflavin (Vit. B2)  0.020 mg  

1%

Niacin (Vit. B3)  0.269 mg  

2%

Pantothenic acid (B5)  0.283 mg 

6%

Vitamin B6  0.043 mg

3%

Folate (Vit. B9)  10 μg 

3%

Vitamin C  33.3 mg

56%

Calcium  12 mg

1%

Iron  0.06 mg

0%

Magnesium  9 mg

2% 

Phosphorus  8 mg

1%

Potassium  148 mg  

3%

Zinc  0.07 mg

1%

Manganese 0.013 mg

 

Percentages are relative to US
recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database