Selectingwinter squash

When selecting winter squash (hard squash), the shell should be intact and show no decay. Winter squash seeds are expected to be hard and inedible and are scooped out before or after cooking. Avoid squash that shows any soft or watery areas.

Varieties Appearance Color Of Shell Color Of Flesh

Acorn

Rigid, acorn-shaped

green, gold or white

Yellow-orange

Banana

Large, cylindrical

Pale yellow to ivory

Orange

Buttercup

Squatty, capped on top

Dark green with light green stripes

Yellow to orange

Butternut

Small round end, thick neck

Tan

Orange

Carnival

Pumpkin-shaped

Pale yellow with green marks

Yellow

Delicata

Long and slender

 

Yellow with green stripes

Yellow to cream

Gold Nugget

Pumpkin-shaped

Orange

Orange

Hubbard

Large, plump middle and tapered neck

Ranges from green blue and orange

Orange

Kabocha

Pumpkin shaped

Light with dark green stripes

Yellow

Red Kuri

Round

Red

Yellow orange

Spaghetti

Oval

Yellow

Yellow to cream

Sweet Dumpling

Pumpkin-shaped

Light with dark green stripes

Orange

Turban

Bumpy, capped

Orange to red with green stripes

Orange

 

Storing

Winter squash should be stored at room temperature, refrigeration will change the flavor and texture. Squash properly stored should keep up to a month or more. Cut squash should be tightly sealed in a plastic bag or wrap up to a week.

Preparation

Winter squash can be cut into halves or pieces, seeds are removed and the squash can be baked, steamed, micro waved or boiled.


Nutrition Information


Winter squash is a good source of complex carbohydrates such as starch, and also fibre. It is also a source of niacin, potassium, iron and beta carotene. Usually, the darker the skin is, the higher the beta carotene content.